Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial


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Update Aug 8 : Editing title to Your Node. Update Aug 10 : Dan McGhan found that one of the tutorials has addressed an issue that I had somehow missed in this documentation. After all, I make mistakes, too. Update May 27 : This post still gets a lot of views, but this post is now months old and may contain obsolete information. I have since resigned myself from trying to harden the Node ecosystem; it is throwing cups of water on a wildfire.

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Ecosystem growth is prioritized over security, and you have to decide whether or not those risks are acceptable to your organization. Note for experienced developers: If you really want to work with state of the art credential storage, Argon2 is the winner of the Password Hashing Competition and now has some easy support in Node.

Unfortunately, documentation for the implementation of Argon2 for novice users in the Node.

The Basics of APIs

The most common ways I have witnessed that people get password reset wrong are: Predictable tokens. Tokens that are based upon the current time are a good example. Tokens made by bad pseudorandom number generators are less obvious. Bad storage. Storing unencrypted password reset tokens in your DB means that if the DB is compromised, those tokens are effectively plaintext passwords. Reset tokens are credentials and should be treated as such. No token expiry.

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Not expiring your tokens gives attackers more time to exploit the reset window. No secondary data verification. Security questions are the de facto data verification for a reset. Of course, then the developer has to choose good security questions. Security questions have their own problems. While this may seem like security overkill, the email address is something you have, not something you know, and conflates the authentication factors. Your email address becomes the key to every account that just sends a reset token to email.

This means that I can get the encryption key and decrypt all of the passwords in event of a breach. The encryption key is shared with the JWT secret.

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I am not sure why this mode specifically was chosen, but the choice alone leaves the ciphertext malleable. Continue the discussion. Hackernoon Newsletter curates great stories by real tech professionals Get solid gold sent to your inbox. Every week! Tomas Trajan Jan Brandon Morelli Mar Louis Cremen. A Brief History in Authentication. Spring sets properties and resolves dependencies as late as possible, when the bean is actually created. This potentially delayed visibility of some configuration issues is why ApplicationContext implementations by default pre-instantiate singleton beans.

At the cost of some upfront time and memory to create these beans before they are actually needed, you discover configuration issues when the ApplicationContext is created, not later. You can still override this default behavior so that singleton beans initialize lazily, rather than being pre-instantiated.

If no circular dependencies exist, when one or more collaborating beans are being injected into a dependent bean, each collaborating bean is totally configured prior to being injected into the dependent bean. This means that, if bean A has a dependency on bean B, the Spring IoC container completely configures bean B prior to invoking the setter method on bean A. In other words, the bean is instantiated if it is not a pre-instantiated singleton , its dependencies are set, and the relevant lifecycle methods such as a configured init method or the InitializingBean callback method are invoked.

A small part of a Spring XML configuration file specifies some bean definitions as follows:. In the preceding example, setters are declared to match against the properties specified in the XML file. The following example uses constructor-based DI:.

The constructor arguments specified in the bean definition are used as arguments to the constructor of the ExampleBean. Now consider a variant of this example, where, instead of using a constructor, Spring is told to call a static factory method to return an instance of the object:. The type of the class being returned by the factory method does not have to be of the same type as the class that contains the static factory method although, in this example, it is.

An instance non-static factory method can be used in an essentially identical fashion aside from the use of the factory-bean attribute instead of the class attribute , so we do not discuss those details here. As mentioned in the previous section , you can define bean properties and constructor arguments as references to other managed beans collaborators or as values defined inline.

The following example shows various values being set:. The following example uses the p-namespace for even more succinct XML configuration:. The preceding XML is more succinct. Such IDE assistance is highly recommended.

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Properties instance by using the JavaBeans PropertyEditor mechanism. The following example shows how to use it:. The preceding bean definition snippet is exactly equivalent at runtime to the following snippet:. The first form is preferable to the second, because using the idref tag lets the container validate at deployment time that the referenced, named bean actually exists. In the second variation, no validation is performed on the value that is passed to the targetName property of the client bean.

Typos are only discovered with most likely fatal results when the client bean is actually instantiated. If the client bean is a prototype bean, this typo and the resulting exception may only be discovered long after the container is deployed. A common place at least in versions earlier than Spring 2. Here, you set the value of the specified property of a bean to be a reference to another bean a collaborator managed by the container. The referenced bean is a dependency of the bean whose property is to be set, and it is initialized on demand as needed before the property is set.

If the collaborator is a singleton bean, it may already be initialized by the container. All references are ultimately a reference to another object.


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Scoping and validation depend on whether you specify the ID or name of the other object through the bean , local, or parent attributes. The value of the bean attribute may be the same as the id attribute of the target bean or be the same as one of the values in the name attribute of the target bean. The following example shows how to use a ref element:.

Specifying the target bean through the parent attribute creates a reference to a bean that is in a parent container of the current container. The value of the parent attribute may be the same as either the id attribute of the target bean or one of the values in the name attribute of the target bean. The target bean must be in a parent container of the current one. You should use this bean reference variant mainly when you have a hierarchy of containers and you want to wrap an existing bean in a parent container with a proxy that has the same name as the parent bean.

The following pair of listings shows how to use the parent attribute:. An inner bean definition does not require a defined ID or name. If specified, the container does not use such a value as an identifier. The container also ignores the scope flag on creation, because inner beans are always anonymous and are always created with the outer bean.

It is not possible to access inner beans independently or to inject them into collaborating beans other than into the enclosing bean. This is not a common scenario. The following example shows how to use them:. The Spring container also supports merging collections. This section on merging discusses the parent-child bean mechanism. Readers unfamiliar with parent and child bean definitions may wish to read the relevant section before continuing.

The following listing shows the result:.

Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial
Using the Force and Support Costing System: An Introductory Guide and Tutorial

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